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Mark Murphy Mark Murphy is current President of Beyond Boundaries, Inc., once famous for world-wide UFO-related expeditions led by his mother and founder, Joyce Murphy. Mark has appeared on ABC's Good Morning America and was featured on the History Channel's UFO Hunters. He is an environmental research scientist by trade with over 25 year's field and laboratory experience, and is a part-time politician. Mark has investigated lava flow cave "little people" in the South Pacific and continues international, extraterrestrial research in his spare time. He plans to revive the scientific and exploratory aspects of Beyond Boundaries in the near future. beyondboundaries.org
Noe Torres Noe Torres is an active member of the UFO research community. His first book about UFOs, co-authored with Ruben Uriarte was Mexico's Roswell: The Chihuahua UFO Crash. Published in 2007, it received wide critical acclaim and was the basis for an episode of the History Channel's UFO Hunters TV series, in which Noe and Ruben made a guest appearance. The book was also featured in the July 2007 issue of UFO Magazine and is currently being considered for production as a motion picture. Noe has appeared on numerous UFO-related TV and radio shows, including George Noory's Coast to Coast AM, Paranormal Radio with Captain Jack, Speaking of Strange, the Jerry Pippin Show, Jaime Maussan's Mysteries of the Third Millenium, and others.

UFO Crash in North Texas
1891

by Mark Murphy and Noe Torres


Posted: 15:00 April 15, 2008

When dozens of people in Erath County, Texas spotted a half mile-long UFO in the skies above them in January 2008, a couple of area residents turned to local history books for clues about what happened. Located 80 miles southwest of Fort Worth, the neighboring towns of Stephenville and Dublin lie in the very midst of what has been, historically, a hotbed for UFO activity. In fact, it has recently come to light that 56 years before the famous Roswell, New Mexico UFO crash of 1947, the tiny town of Dublin was the site of a Roswell-like event, involving an aerial explosion of a UFO, followed by the discovery of strange debris containing mysterious, undecipherable writing.

Saturday, June 13, 1891, was a quiet summer day in Dublin, which had a population of just over 2,000 people. One of town’s major industries, the Wasson & Miller flour mill and cotton gin, had already wound down operations for the week. As evening came, a number of local residents were outdoors near the gin, walking and otherwise enjoying the leisurely summer weekend. Among the persons in the vicinity, the Dublin newspaper later reported, was an unnamed “gentleman” who witnessed an event like few others in the history of human affairs.

UFO Crash in North Texas, 1891
Front page of Dublin Progress, June 20, 1891

The unidentified man, described by the newspaper as a generally trustworthy witness, observed a bright, oblong-shaped object hovering about 300 feet in the sky above the gin. Although referred to as a “meteor,” the UFO’s strange behavior suggested that it was something entirely different. Struggling to describe the strange object in the terminology of an era before air travel, the witness stated that it looked like “a bale of cotton suspended in the air after having been saturated in kerosene oil and ignited, except that it created a much brighter light, almost dazzling those who perceived it.” While the general appearance was like a cotton bale, the observer gave no indication of the dimensions or overall size of the object. Apparently, he was so frightened by the UFO that he hastily withdrew from the scene before making any sort of guess at the object’s dimensions.

Especially striking about this account is the extreme intensity of light that emanated from the UFO. A kerosene-sparked flame would certainly not be bright enough to be said to “dazzle” viewers who stood several hundred feet away. This object, hovering in the sky above Dublin, exhibited a “much brighter light” than a conventional fire. The intense light may have been a sign that the air vehicle was in some kind of distress. Perhaps a fire had broken out on board the craft or something had caused it to overheat and build toward an explosion.

The observer noted that the dazzling object remained in the sky for an unspecified length of time and then, with a tremendously loud sound like that of a bombshell, the UFO suddenly exploded, violently hurtling metallic fragments of a most unusual character to the ground below and burning to a crisp all the surrounding grass and vegetation. The sound of the explosion was so loud that “nearly everyone in that portion of the city” heard it, according to the newspaper.

A more precise description of the object prior to the explosion is not available, we are told, because the observer was so badly frightened by what he saw that he “hastily” ran away and hid. Embarrassed by his fear and lack of scientific curiosity, he did return to the area the next day, but because of the initial instinct to flee, according to the newspaper account, “it was utterly impossible to obtain an accurate account of the dimensions and general appearance” of the UFO prior to the explosion.

The eyewitness must have had a restless night’s sleep thinking about the amazing sight his eyes had beheld that evening. He was certainly still intensely curious, and early on Sunday Morning, June 14, 1891, he returned to the scene of the fiery explosion he had witnessed. What he found was perhaps even more frightening to him than the events of the night before.

Some historical facts make the believability and extraterrestrial nature of the Dublin exploding UFO very compelling, even for skeptics. At the time, people did not have concepts of unearthly beings, space craft, or even air craft. One must imagine that any type of contact or witnessing of a possible would be depicted in terms of what people of that time knew or had previously experienced. Simple folk of that time would have explained such an event in terms that they knew, floating cotton bales glowing brighter than burning kerosene or similarly. Such a report would be akin to the way Ezekiel described the biblical “wheel in the middle of a wheel” and “like burning coals of fire, and like the appearance of lamps”. This Dublin event was a full seven years before H.G. Wells had written War of the Worlds, and the first widespread depictions of alien beings visiting Earth had emerged to the general public. This event was one year prior to the earliest known version of extraterrestrials first described in The Germ Growers (1892), by Robert Potter. [Ed. See: Wikipedia reference, "Notable invasion literature" in Invasion Literature.]

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